Using ArcGIS for Military Planning and Operations

Ben Conklin and Derek Foll show how to use ArcGIS to build basemaps and operational layers for military planning.

Embed
Download
Transcript
480x270
960x540
Custom
Width:
Height:
Start From:
Player Color:

Right-click on these links to download and save this video.

Transcript

00:01What we’re going to talk about today is using ArcGIS in order to support military planning and operations.

00:06This is not going to be a workshop about the planning process or the operations process in the military.

00:11I’ll assume you have some level of familiarity. I’ll try not to use too many acronyms or too much jargon.

00:16But I’ll assume you understand the process.

00:18What we’re really just going to talk about is the tools and resources available to support these activities in the military.

00:26So we’re going to, some of the goals of the workshop is to look at…

00:30…how ArcGIS is an enterprise system which can support military planning and operations.

00:35Talk a little bit about the concepts involved and how GIS layers are composed and how you’d use them as part of this process.

00:41Talk about how we can actually share some of that information with mobile applications and web applications…

00:49…and just some of the resources we have available for you along with some recommendations and best practices.

00:54So this fits into our overall solution initiatives. Those of you who were around this morning…

00:58…we talked about ArcGIS for national government.

01:00As part of that initiative, we have a focus on the defense and intelligence community.

01:04We’re really focused on kind of three solution areas inside the community.

01:10So one of those areas is intelligence…really the national intelligence agencies and support to that national mission.

01:17Production mapping, which is really about producing and compiling foundation content…

01:21…which is the baseline and the backbone of this workflow.

01:25And then finally, our military operations-related solutions, and that’s what we’re really going to talk about today…

01:30…is these specific solutions, that are…

01:33…in this session today, these specific solutions that are focused around military operations.

01:37And really, what we’re going to focus on here is a piece that we’ve been building…

01:41…as part of our ArcGIS for the military land operations.

01:43So this is going to be completely land focused. We’re going to…some of the process and some of the techniques…

01:48…I’m going to talk about would work in maritime scenarios as well, but there’d be some differences in them.

01:52We’re going to spend some time on that this year. Land operations are the most mature of our solutions…

01:58…and that’s where we have some of these tools and templates coming from.

02:01So just to give real quick basics of…those of you coming in here maybe…

02:05…that are maybe more from the operations or planning community…

02:08…may not have as much knowledge on GIS. I just want to touch on some of the key aspects of it so you understand…

02:12…what the GIS model is when you’re thinking about it from a planning and operations context.

02:17So the key thing about a GIS is that it uses a layer-based model for describing the world, so those layers can be…

02:23…what we often refer to as vector layers, are basically stored in feature classes, or they can be imagery raster layers.

02:29So raster layers can be things like elevation data, optical imagery, that kind of stuff.

02:33And all the layers have attributes and descriptive information that accompany it.

02:36So all the values that you see in your features are stored as these attributes, as part of the features in a feature class.

02:43And so basically, the key paradigm, of course, when you’re inside a GIS is…

02:46…we use maps to visualize and work with geographic information.

02:49So this is kind of a key definition, ‘cause sometimes when I say maps to people from the planning community…

02:54…they think of a thing that they’d put their plan on top of. But what I’m describing when I talk about a map is…

02:59…the plan itself, the overlay, the thing that you draw in geographic space.

03:04So the paradigm of a map inside of a GIS is everything that you can model in geographic space.

03:10The other key component of a GIS, and this is why it’s really useful for planning and operations…

03:14…is it supports a rich analytic model that actually lets you do more than just visualize and interact with information.

03:20You can actually do deep spatial analysis and data processing inside of a GIS.

03:26So when, as I mentioned before, maps is not just the thing that you look at and draw your information on top of.

03:32It’s actually a very powerful concept. So inside of a GIS, you use maps to do things like compile information, find patterns,…

03:39…derive new information using analysis, communicate plans and ideas, which is going to be one of our main focus…

03:44…and get status reports, so that’s kind of the planning and operations components.

03:48When you’re working with maps in a GIS, there’s a key concept, which is really basemaps plus operational layers.

03:54So basemaps are that thing that you overlay your plan on top of. So it’s that basis on which you do your planning…

04:00…the common map that represents your terrain and other relevant information.

04:04Now on top of that, you have your operational layers. The operational layers are really the things you interact with…

04:09…and make decisions on. So they might be things like targets, facilities, unit locations, other reporting information.

04:14As I mentioned, a couple of the key themes of maps, of uses of maps, include things like communicating plans and ideas.

04:23So you use them to do things like create and share plans and assessments. So this would be things like your…

04:27…friendly and enemy course of actions or your target packages…

04:31…or your daily briefs as part of your regular operations process.

04:34The key thing about these maps is they include some key elements.

04:37So they include features that you can sketch on top of the map to share your information.

04:42They include layouts and presentation modes for sharing relevant comments, and they also have useful animation…

04:48…when you’re showing stuff over a timeline.

04:51Maps are also a useful way to get status reports so you can look at the current locations of units and equipment…

04:56…their current disposition. When you’re using these kind of maps, they include tools for inputting reports and also…

05:02…layers that show current information.

05:05And they’re frequently viewed on the web or in common operational picture environments.

05:10A key concept, when we talk about maps and sharing maps, and you’re going to see this in the workflows we follow…

05:16…is really just two different ways that you can share information in a GIS.

05:19So analysts or even planners in this workflow, that are kind of the professional guys working on dedicated workstations…

05:25…are going to share maps and other information with each other using packages…

05:29 And that package is just a...all the map, the symbology, the layers, the useful tools…

05:35…all combined into a single package and shared with other professionals.

05:39You can also share maps with everyone through services. So these would be, this is how you enable, you know…

05:44…devices and consumers of the information you’re creating, is by sharing the information with them in the service.

05:51And then those services are brought to life through focused and custom applications.

05:56What we’re going to start talking about now are some templates we’re creating to support planning and operations.

06:00…our decision support template, which is really the template to create the doctrinal decision support template…

06:03So we’re going to talk about some tools we have for general overlay sketching. So these tools are very, very generic.

06:09They’re just designed to support sketching any kind of military standard overlay. They’re really based around the layers…

06:15…and of information you use that support the kind of standard 2525 symbology.

06:19So they’re your tactical overlays…

06:21…and they’re broken into themes of information that you typically work with at a single time.

06:27We also have some templates we’re creating that show things like situational awareness over the web…

06:32…and templates for incorporating information during the operations process, like after a patrol…

06:37…to capture data from the patrol and bring it back into your GIS.

06:42A big chunk of our focus today is going to be on some new templates that we’ve been working on…

06:52…which is a physical product. It includes things like your sit. temp….

06:54…your event temp., and your named areas of interest and target areas of interest.

06:58We’ll spend some time going through that in detail, so no need to worry about it now.

07:02We’ll also take a look at the Vehicle Commander application, which is our in-vehicle mounted application…

07:07…and our Squad Leader application. So the first thing we’ll take a look at is…

07:13…the building blocks of all of these templates, which is something we refer to as military features.

07:17So military features are really all about, how do you sketch your standard classic military overlay on top of that basemap…

07:24…using these various operational layers. Like I said, these are generic templates that really just help you sketch…

07:28…any kind of operational overlay…

07:30…and all the other examples we’ll show you later are built upon this concept of military features.

07:35Let me turn over to Derek to show you an example of that.

07:42Alright. So, can everyone hear me? Okay.

07:44So as Ben mentioned, we’ve got a couple templates out there.

07:46One of the first ones we’re going to go over is just simple templates for sketching…

07:51…some of your military features you might see…

08:00…as you’re drawing out some of your planning. So what you see here is the ArcGIS Resource Center…

08:02…and you see there’s an area here for User Communities. Under that, there’s a link for Defense and Intelligence.

08:08So when you click that, that takes you to our defense and intelligence resource center page.

08:14We’ve got a couple links here for some information. Ben mentioned basemaps…

08:17…some information if you want more on planning or operations.

08:21What we’re going to focus on today is some of our defense templates that Ben mentioned.

08:24So we’re going to go there, and you’ll see two links here. One is a link to a group on the resource center…

08:31…that is created and used by our team. That’s the ArcGIS for Defense and Intelligence Group.

08:36And there’s another link to a group here. That’s the Defense and Intelligence Community Group.

08:42So we’ll go ahead and we’ll click on this Defense and Intelligence Group…

08:44…and that’s going to bring up a list of some of our different templates and products that we’ve posted here…

08:52…some layer packages, for example. Now, as Ben mentioned…

08:56…one of the templates I want to show off is one for military overlay editing.

09:00So I’m just going to go ahead and search for a friendly overlay. Whoops, excuse me.

09:09We’ll search for that, and we actually get two templates, two layer packages returned to us…

09:14…one for military overlays, which will actually include all the different features you might want to sketch…

09:19…and then one that we’ve designed just for friendly operations that includes your feature templates for whatever…

09:24…friendly maneuvers and plans you wanted to draw.

09:28So we’ll go ahead, and we can just download that layer package to our computer, and while that’s downloading…

09:33…I’ve actually opened up another map with that layer package unzipped, or unpackaged…

09:40…and placed into my map already.

09:42And you can see, we’ve got all the feature templates created for all the different types of military features you may want to draw.

09:52We’ve even got some in here for units. If you want to place in some more units to your sketch, you can go ahead and place…

10:03I’ll place a couple companies down here. And then, we’ll just save. Like Ben said, we’re just going to come up with a fictional plan.

10:11But we’ll save for this exercise. We know that we want to set up an assembly area just south of this dam right here.

10:18So in my features window, I can actually go ahead and just search for assembly area…

10:23…and that’s going to return the feature template to draw an assembly area.

10:25So I’ll click that, and I’ll select the Construction tool…

10:29…and go ahead and draw in my assembly area right here. Now, I also happen to know...

10:34…we want to set up a blocking position along this road right here. So once again, in my Create Features window…

10:40…I can just go ahead and search for a blocking template. I’ll go ahead and select that and just draw one of those in.

10:50And then lastly, we’ll say that we want to…

10:52…set up a ground attack into a stronghold that we know is in this area right here.

10:58So I’ll just go ahead and, once again, I’m going to search for attack, and I’ll set up my ground main attack…

11:07…and go ahead and draw that in from our assembly area. And then you can see that basically I’ve drawn…

11:15…I’ve drawn in the features for a simple plan. Ideally, you may want to draw something more complicated like this…

11:20…but this does give you the building blocks of how you go about creating one of the plans that Ben mentioned earlier.

11:28[Unintelligible]

11:34So what you just saw there is example of the very basic template for sketching out military features.

11:39So you could use this for any type of just standard military overlay. The way you’d work with that template is…

11:44…you’d download it, use it inside your environment, and probably modify it and customize it to be the kind of graphics…

11:51…that you would work with the most. So we put everything that said 2525 into those layers…

11:56…but you’d add in specific templates for your units which are part of your organization…

12:00…maybe a standard enemy order of battle, and you’d remove stuff you don’t use very often.

12:04And then you’d just use that as a template for every time you create your sketches, so this is designed to make it…

12:08…and streamline the workflow for creating sketches inside of ArcGIS.

12:14So now we’re actually going to move into some of our templates that are a little more focused on the overall operations process.

12:19So, not that we’re going to spend a lot of time talking through the details of the operations process…

12:24…there’s plenty of material out there if you want to read up on this.

12:27But basically, the operations process essentially…

12:28…is a continuous process, so we’re going to show it to you essentially in just a couple blocks with a couple of examples.

12:34But it’s a continuing process, and the way we’re going to look at it is just a couple of examples…

12:38…which is really the planning portion and the execution portion.

12:41But essentially go through a portion where you’d plan it, you assess and plan…

12:46…you prepare for an operation, you conduct an operation, you review the results, and so on and so forth.

12:51So we’re going to just take a look at this process in a little more detail. So the planning process itself is really…

13:00…we support a few different methodologies for this.

13:03The one we’re going to focus on is really the military decision-making process…

13:06…or MDMP. And so essentially is, we have a few elements of it that we look at, you know…

13:11…receiving your mission, performing your analysis, course of action, sketching.

13:14You’re really going to do that through those just kind of generic examples we showed you with your military feature sketching.

13:19So you develop your various course-of-action sketches, either for your own forces or for the enemy forces.

13:25And you work through those kind of standard overlay generation using some of our other terrain analysis tools to do IPB…

13:31…et cetera. So after you’ve done that part of the process, you’re going to move into what’s referred to as…

13:35…the decision support template, which is really the final phase before actually…

13:39…integrating the plan and conducting your ISR plan and actually putting your plan into execution.

13:47So this is that process in a little bit more detail inside the military decision-making process.

13:53And we won’t spend a whole lot of time on there, but I put this in here just so if you want to look back at this later…

13:58…and have a reference to dive into the process. So as I mentioned, you’d create your plans…

14:04…which really includes your individual sketches, your decision support template. You’d share those plans…

14:09…you’d either share those plans with others in your environment…

14:13…so either subordinate commands or your fellow staff officers…

14:17…or you’d share those plans via services, which would let you put them out to the various devices that are operational…

14:22…and available in the field, and you’d communicate the plan and then do some rehearsal of mission.

14:27We’re going to focus on specifically, is really the decision support template…

14:30… which is really about just kind of essentially, couple critical elements as part of the planning process.

14:36There’s some additional artifacts, but there’s a couple specific things that decision support helps you with.

14:41So as I mentioned, the identification of your enemy courses of action and your assessing the environment…

14:46… were really the creation of your MCOO. It’s something you do before that…

14:50…and we have other templates and tools to help you do that part of the process. At this point…

14:54…when you’re in the decision support template, you would actually be incorporating those products…

14:58…and then performing some additional analysis. And what you’re looking for in this case…

15:02…is you’re looking for named areas of interest, which is going to help you identify enemy activity.

15:05So figure out which plan the enemy’s executing based on observed activity.

15:10And identify areas of influence in the battle, so…

15:12…areas you might want to target or be able to bring, bear their arms against a specific area.

15:18So those are your target areas of interest. So these are key things that you identify during the planning process…

15:22…so that you can actually more effectively engage in the campaign. And the GIS is really useful in this process.

15:28We’re mostly going to focus on, in this example, is the mechanics of performing that process.

15:33There’s many tools in a GIS which improve your decision making. We’re not going to really focus on those now.

15:39Those are all available in various forms. We’re going to use a little bit of a couple of examples of them.

15:44But really, you can use the rich toolset to do really complex analysis. So the focus is going to be on the mechanics…

15:48…of how you actually go through identifying, capturing NAIs from various courses of action…

15:53…combining those, consolidating them, picking the ones that are key indicators…

15:56…and then actually using those as part of your actual process.

16:01So we’re going to move into that. As a forewarning, there’s going to be a lot of clicking around in here.

16:06Those of you not familiar with ArcGIS, you may not be all that familiar with it, but like I said…

16:10…this is a useful process that can be aided by the tools in the GIS, and like I said, we’ll just focus on creating the NAIs.

16:17Now Derek over here isn’t exactly a tactician, so maybe his NAIs aren’t the best ones in the world…

16:21…so just bear with that, alright. Over to Derek.

16:29Okay, thanks, Ben. So one of the first things Ben mentioned was that this decision support template…

16:36…we’re going to eventually release this as one of the templates that our team does.

16:40If any of you are familiar with some of our other templates the team has released…

16:44…you’ll notice a similar folder structure when you go and actually download the template.

16:47We’ve got folders here containing some of the documentation about using the template…

16:52…that also contain documentation about setting up the template, PDFs, some examples.

16:58We’ve got a folder here for label expressions. This will contain your layer files that are relevant to the template…

17:02…for any of you that are familiar with some of our other templates. Also, most of our other templates…

17:08…contain some sort of MXDs and geodatabases that accompany the template…

17:13…usually with exercise data in them already. You can see here, we’ve got some of those folders.

17:18This will also include premade course of actions when you download the template.

17:24Obviously, when you’re using this, you would have teams creating your own courses of action.

17:29We’ve got folders here that contain three different enemy courses of action.

17:34Some people refer to them as course of action 1, 2, and 3.

17:37Others actually will label them as Alternate, Most Dangerous, and Most Likely. We’ve got those in there.

17:43Your accompanying layer files that will go with those maps, as well. And we’ve also got a folder here that…

17:49…contains the toolboxes and all the supporting scripts that run some of the tools that I’ll show you in a couple minutes.

17:56So after that real quick tour of our templates and what the decision support template looks like…

18:02…I’m going to actually go ahead. I’m going to switch over and jump right into the template…

18:07…and jump into my SitTemp.mxd that actually is one of those course-of-action MXDs that we looked at earlier.

18:14This one in particular happens to be for the enemy course of action number 2…

18:19…which was the most dangerous course of action.

18:23As Ben mentioned, I’m not exactly a military tactician, so I don’t know, maybe this would not be the most dangerous.

18:28In this scenario, the enemy will actually come down from a strongpoint that they have in the mountains…

18:33…and they’re actually attempting to damage the dam and take out some of the local infrastructure…

18:38…by them flooding out the area south of the dam and the city.

18:43So I’ll go ahead and I’ll get rid of that enemy course of action, just to clear up our screen a little bit.

18:47And before I jump too far into things and get too far ahead of myself, here’s another example.

18:53You can see the same Tools folder we looked at earlier.

18:55It contains our toolboxes for the decision support template.

18:58And then some of our accompanying toolsets that contain some of those tools that’ll assist you in creating…

19:03…your decision support template and helping you…

19:06…get a better idea of some of the decisions that you might want to make.

19:09As Ben mentioned, we’re not going to make any decisions for you in these templates.

19:12We’re just simply trying to provide some tools so you can make a better decision.

19:18So the first thing you’ll see here is we’ve got some enemy units that are here in our display…

19:24…and what we think their path and their course of action might be.

19:28You can also notice, there’s a bunch of crazy labels around them, it’s a little bit hard to decipher at first. But actually what…

19:34…you’re looking at is, some of these units are actually labeled as indicator units or high-value target…

19:40…and that’s actually one of the labels you’ll see here. Some of them are both. You’ll see the indicator of…

19:45…an I/HVT, which denotes that that unit, when it starts doing something…

19:50…will actually be an indicator of a certain course of action…

19:54…and that may be a high-value target throughout that course of action.

20:00We’ve actually, if we can go and we can take a look at that…

20:03…attribute table real quick, you can see the same info right there.

20:06We’ve actually got those fields highlighted, just to kind of draw your eye to the field. And you can see…

20:11…is this an indicator of this course of, in this case, course of action 2; in this case, you can see that, yes, it is.

20:19So in the interest of time, I’ve drawn in a couple named areas of interest and targeted an area of interest already.

20:25But just to kind of show you the process and how this would work, I’ve left a couple empty.

20:30We’ve got this field artillery unit here that we thought, if they’re going to go for the dam would be an indicator…

20:36…of course of action 2, that they’d be setting up north of the dam, and…

20:41…they’d be setting up to attack the dam from across the water.

20:45So I went ahead and I left that empty so we could draw in some named areas of interest.

20:48So to do that, I’ll actually go ahead and we’ll start an edit session. And we’ll pull up our Create Features window here.

20:59And just like we did earlier with the military features overlay, we’ll go ahead and we’ll search for a named areas of interest template.

21:06You can see, we’ve got one right there. So I’ll select my template, and then I’m going to just real quickly…

21:11…draw in a named area of interest in the small area that we’re setting up here, where we believe they may set up.

21:18Now, in the real world, you’d probably have an analyst working for you that would…

21:21…have a much better idea of exactly where they’ll set up…

21:24…and he’d be pulling in other products to help make that decision of where you might want to look for that unit.

21:31And also, we know that if we do see them in that area…

21:33…we want to try to engage them before they can cause too much damage.

21:36So we can actually search for a template for a targeted area of interest as well, and we’ll draw one of those in there…

21:45…right in that same area. So, like I said, I’ve drawn in one quick example of doing those.

21:54If you were doing this in real life, you’d go through the entire process of drawing in…

21:57…all your named areas of interest and your targeted areas of interest.

22:03Now, assuming we have all our course of action and we’ve drawn in all our areas of interest…

22:08…the next thing you want to start doing for analysis is to pull all those named areas of interest...

22:13…and targeted areas of interest into one geodatabase so you can work with them all at one time…

22:17…instead of having a bunch of different scattered geodatabases and trying to work with all these feature classes separately.

22:24So let’s actually, we’ll start getting into some of the…

22:27…one of the first tools that we have published with the decision support template is a tool that’s…

22:31…Collate Sit Temps, and what that’s going to do is go and…

22:34…take all those areas of interest from all those different courses of action…

22:37…and pull those into one geodatabase. So I’ll go ahead and run that real quick, and you’ll see, in our map…

22:44…what’ll happen is, all our named areas of interest and, of course, our targeted areas of interest will be pulled…

22:50…into one geodatabase and will appear in our map. So, there you are, right here. This actually shows us…

22:58…the two we drew a second ago are right there.

23:01So this actually includes all the different ones from the three courses of action that we had.

23:13So, as you go along, you’re going to have all these areas of interest, and you’re going to think…

23:17…Alright, great. Now I’ve got to start doing something with them.

23:23But one thing you want to remember that you want to do is…

23:26…we’ve got a couple different named areas of interest here to the north where that enemy’s strongpoint was…

23:34…but we really don’t need to have multiple named areas of interest that would all be indicators.

23:39What we can do is actually merge those into one named area of interest…

23:43…and actually associate all those different courses of action with that one larger named area of interest.

23:49So the next thing I will do is, we actually have a tool here you’ll see.

23:53It’s called Merge NAIs, and it’s going to do exactly that process I just described.

23:57What you do is just select any area where you know…

24:00…alright, we’ve got multiple overlapping named areas of interest, and we’ll run that tool with them selected…

24:05…and it’ll actually turn them into one. So just to show you that real quick…

24:12You can see here, I’ve got two named areas of interest selected in my table…

24:17…and we’ll go ahead and we’ll run that Merge tool.

24:22It’s going to take those, and you can see here in the dialog, it’s actually telling you that it’s associating course of action 1…

24:28…and course of action 2 into a new named area of interest, and then when that finishes running…

24:33…we’ll be left with just one polygon feature, and it’ll know that it applies to both courses of action 1 and 2.

24:40So, now we’ve got just one named area of interest here, and if we look at those same features again…

24:47And now it tells us that that one--those specific courses of action 1 and 2, if you see any indicators going on…

24:54…in that named area of interest.

24:58So now, you would go ahead and you would merge and delete any areas of interest that you know…

25:03…we have overlapping or we decide we don’t need that one. You would go through that whole process.

25:08Once you’ve merged and deleted everything that you don’t need anymore, your next step is…

25:12…you want to go ahead and you want to number all those named areas of interest to give them a unique ID so you can tell…

25:17…alright, if we have an indicator unit in this area performing this activity…

25:23…we know we have a good name for that named area of interest…

25:26…for example, Named Area of Interest 6. So the next tool we’ll run is this Number NAI tool.

25:37And it runs really quick. What that’s done is that’s gone and actually numbered all our named areas of interest.

25:45So you can see here, if you’re wondering how it actually picks the sequence, it starts points, lines, then areas…

25:51…so all of our point named area of interests would start out with numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4.

26:00And if we go to our areas, you can see we’ve got 9 through 13, and you can see here, that same named area of interest…

26:10…that we merged earlier still has courses of action 1 and 2 assigned to it.

26:18So after we’ve done that, your next step is, alright, great.

26:22You’ve got all these named areas of interest and these targeted areas of interest, and they’ve got numbers…

26:26…and they’ve got courses of action assigned to them.

26:29But that doesn’t help you a whole lot because you need to have those actual…

26:33…indicator units associated with those named areas of interest somehow.

26:36So I’m going to turn back on my indicator units, and what I’m going to do is…

26:43…I’m going to run an add-in from the local government team called the Attribute Assistant.

26:47And what that’s going to do is that’s going to take all those indicator units and join them spatially…

26:52…with the named areas of interest that they coincide with. So to do that, I’ll just select actually…

27:00…all of my indicator units and all of my areas of interest at one time, and I’m going to run that Attribute Assistant.

27:08And as I mentioned…excuse me.

27:17So, it went ahead and it asked me, Do you want to run the Attribute Assistant…

27:22…for all the rows that represent the different area of interest polygons I had. And what that’s done is now…

27:31…this named area of interest polygon…

27:32…knows that it applies to those three indicator units that were contained within it spatially.

27:39So now I’ve associated everything.

27:43I know that if I see a certain indicator unit doing something in a certain area of interest…

27:47…it’s an indicator of course of action 2. So it’s great to know all that, but one other step I need to do is…

27:53…I want to generate some sort of event matrix that I can look at and actually see in a table…

27:58…alright, in named area of interest 3, this field artillery unit is an indicator of this course of action.

28:07So the last step I’m going to do is actually run the tool called the Generate Event Matrix tool.

28:16And that’s actually taking and that’s adjoining the tables from those indicator units and joining that up…

28:21…with the tables from the named area of interest. And that’s actually going to give me a table that will say, alright…

28:35…as I just explained, named area of interest 6, this indicator unit will be doing this. That’s an indicator of course of action 3.

28:41Then that can help you go on and start to do some of your war-gaming, create some of your decision points.

28:46So I’ve run that event matrix.

29:20Sorry about that. Okay, so I’ve gone ahead and I’ve run my Create Event Matrix tool.

29:33And like I said, that’s actually going to give me a view of my different named areas of interest and my indicator units…

29:40…that are in those and tell me what’s going on. So to illustrate that, what I’ll do is I’ll select my event matrix…

29:48…and I’ll go down and we’ll look at the same field artillery unit that we were looking at earlier.

29:57And if we select this row in the event matrix, it’ll tell us, it’ll select that event that it’s created in the matrix…

30:00…if we see them stopping north of the lake and starting to dig in and set up…

30:04…and it’ll tell us that for that field artillery unit…

30:11…in named area of interest 9, that’s going to be an indicator of course of action 2. And then you can go ahead…

30:20…and you can start making your decision points and preparing for there. So if you do want to check that out…

30:26…we can also go down and we can select our named area of interest and look at…okay…

30:31…named area of interest 9. We see that right there…

30:35…and we see this artillery unit, so you can actually select that unit, too.

30:45And, see, there’s our same artillery unit that we were looking at earlier. So ideally…

30:52…this wouldn’t be the ideal way you’d want to look at something. If you were looking at this…

30:56…you might want to have a couple whiteboards set up that you could tack a map onto one board…

31:01…maybe of this event matrix onto another board…

31:03…and then maybe have a couple different screens set up that you can project this on…

31:07…but with just the one screen, we’re kind of stuck with the view of just looking at the table the way it was.

31:14And that’s one of the things that we’re actually working on, so…

31:19Once you have this view, you can say, alright.

31:22You can go ahead and maybe put in some decision points or start making decisions in your war-gaming process…

31:27…and decide how you want to proceed from there. And then, Ben?

31:36Alright, thanks, Derek. So, as I mentioned…

31:38…he’s going through the mechanical process of actually creating your decision support template.

31:42During that actual workflow in your identifying named areas of interest and your enemy course of action…

31:46…you’d use our other templates for, you know, military aspects of terrain, visibility and range…

31:52…those kind of templates in order to actually assess the feasibility of those individual courses of action…

31:56…and actually probably develop those NAIs, but for the sake of time, we stuck with just the actual mechanical process.

32:03So as we showed it, we’ve got the decision support template. It’s got contents for managing…

32:08…the information inside of a geodatabase, some custom tools really to help with that mechanical part of the process…

32:14…as well as some terrain analysis and visibility tools…

32:16…and then maps for actually consuming and visualizing that information.

32:19As Derek mentioned, you’d really use that in more of a multimonitor environment…

32:23…or operational environment when you’re done and producing and sharing those products.

32:27Alright, what we’re going to move on to now is the current operations template.

32:30So after you’ve gone through your planning phase, preparation…

32:33…and then now we’re on to moving really into the execution phase…

32:37…and actually watching and monitoring current operations.

32:40So I mentioned these a little bit earlier, but we’ll go through them again.

32:43So essentially, we’ve got three templates all related to managing and monitoring operations.

32:48So we have our Vehicle Commander application, which is really an in-vehicle situational awareness application…

32:53…that we built based on feedback and working with programs like the FBCB2 program.

32:58Our Android application, which we’re building…

33:00…working with the army on for dismounted troops in the field for handheld units.

33:05And then also our situational awareness web application template, which is really the browser-based application…

33:11…you’d use to view the current in-the-field situational awareness information.

33:15They’re all based on a common information model…

33:16…that can be shared between these different devices and between the brigade headquarters.

33:23During the operation, you’re actually conducting your movement and maneuver…

33:25…and you’re also looking at things like specific types of reporting that would be coming in from the field.

33:32So when we talk about the mounted or dismounted environments, there’s really a couple workflows…

33:36…well, a couple pieces of this information model.

33:39We’ve got the basemaps that are being provisioned from the server to the field…

33:43…and they have specific reports that are being collected by the forces in the field.

33:48So with that, we’re going to go ahead and turn it over to Derek, and we’ll take a look at a couple of these applications.

33:56Okay. So, as Ben mentioned, we’ve got two of our templates for operations that we’re going to look at.

34:03The first one is the Vehicle Commander. Some of you may have seen this in earlier workshops today.

34:09Vehicle Commander is designed for, you know, a heads-up display for a vehicle commander that’s driving around.

34:17One of the first things that you’ll see in this is we can, you know, we see ourself floating around.

34:21We also have, you know, you can center on yourself and you can switch your navigation mode so that north is always up.

34:31You can switch it so that your bearing is always up, or you can switch it as I’ve switched it back to you…

34:35…so that north is always up.

34:38As Ben mentioned, you can provision different basemaps to this. In this case…

34:43…we’ve just got a simple imagery and topographic and scanned maps provisioned in this one.

34:49You could provision whatever maps might be relevant to your mission that you want to check out…

34:53…have there while you’re displaying. You can see, we can switch over to our scanned maps.

34:56You can click again and switch over to your topo map.

35:00And once again, we’re back to our imagery. You zoom in, those… Depending on how you’ve cast your maps…

35:09…those will actually change and you’ll see different levels of detail as you zoom in and out.

35:14So if you want to use a topo map that’s got your building footprints in there, you can actually see that…

35:18…or if you want to look at imagery, you can switch back to that and kind of see the streets as you’re driving around.

35:25You also notice, you can see some of your other units that’re in the field around you that are reporting.

35:30So you know who’s close to you, what’s going on.

35:34We’ve also got a 911 reporting button, and what that’ll actually do is…

35:38…that’ll switch, and that’ll put you into 911 status, so as your partners are out there driving around…

35:45…if you were one of these…if they were looking at you and you were one of these units…

35:49…you’d actually see your unit pulsing red to let them know that…

35:53…hey, I got a situation over here. I need someone right now, or I need some help or something like that.

36:00So you’ve got the 911 and then if, you know, if you find yourself back out of danger, you can toggle...

36:06… your 911 back off. Another thing that you have in the Vehicle Commander is the ability to create chem lights.

36:12And see over here on the left side, we’ve got your four, just four generic chem lights. Ideally, these could be customized…

36:18…in your unit if you’re using certain…maybe you’re using five chem lights or only three, you could customize that…

36:24…to knock down the number of buttons. You know, you can drop chem lights…

36:29…and let other units in the area know what’s going on.

36:34Another type of reporting that you can do from the Vehicle Commander app is…

36:38… you can actually create spot reports, and these will send back…

36:42A lot of you saw the situation viewer earlier today, and this will actually send back and these will report those units…

36:47…and so, back in the rear, you can see. So you can just click on your units or your reports and click Spot Report.

36:55And then just go ahead and you’ll start filling in your information for your spot report. So you can just say you saw a group of…

37:02…four guys that were not really doing much, just moving around, but they look kind of suspicious.

37:07And you can select your location from a map or, if you knew the coordinates, you want to put in yourself…

37:12…probably most times, it’s going to be easiest just to click on the map where you saw them.

37:16So you can say, I saw those guys over there. They were just wearing kind of plain clothes.

37:21They weren’t noticeably affiliated with anyone. The time you saw them was just now.

37:26If you wanted, you could click Other.

37:27We’ll just click Now. And then you can click what type of equipment you saw them with.

37:32In this case, we’ll say we saw them with rifles.

37:36They were just kind of suspicious group of three guys that’s hanging around in plain clothes in a truck.

37:40And you can click Send, and that’ll actually create that spot report on the map. That’s actually been sent back…

37:45…and they can see that in the rear now, and so, they can start looking into that and following up on that if they need to.

37:54Then another navigation aspect, if you wanted to…

37:57…you can focus back on yourself, and we also have the ability to add…

38:02…overlays in the Vehicle Commander, so if you had been given a map package or a layer package of some plans…

38:12…and you wanted to be able to pull up those plans on the fly, in your map…

38:15…you can go back over to your options and you have the ability to add overlays.

38:19So we’ll click on that, and in this case, we’ll just add in…

38:22…what our course of action plans were for this one so we can actually, we’ll be able to tell, alright…

38:28…what’s everyone else doing at the time, and we’ll be able to see, alright…

38:32…we’ll know we can follow along with that or not.

38:36And so, after the Vehicle Commander, the next thing we want to show is our Squad Leader app…

38:41…and that’s actually going to be back on Ben’s computer.

38:55So once again, some of you have seen this, the Squad Leader app.

38:59Yeah. Some of you have seen this… There we go.

39:04Some of you have seen the Squad Leader app in earlier workshops today.

39:07Once again, it’s a heads-up display intended to be used by actually guys out there on the ground, you know…

39:12…running around in the city. And so, you want a real good…

39:16…a quick heads-up picture of who’s around you, what’s going on, and other reporting that might be coming on…

39:21…as well as be able to orient yourself around your surroundings. So in regards to orientation, the first thing…

39:29…just like we saw in the Vehicle Commander, we have the ability to switch between basemaps…

39:33…whatever basemaps have been provisioned to your device. We can use this, and we can click between our topographic map…

39:44We have a scan map here, and we can go back to our imagery if you need to. So, another thing…

39:52I showed dropping chem lights in the Vehicle Commander app.

39:58The Squad Leader app, we can also drop chem lights. So if I want to drop a red chem light right next to our map…

40:04…I can go ahead and drop that there, and you’ll see the chem light’s been added.

40:08And just like the Vehicle Commander, that’s actually being added, and anyone that’s looking at that situation viewer…

40:13…that a couple of you have seen earlier, they’re actually seeing that spot report pop up, and they know that’s going on, too.

40:19You also have the ability to change those chem lights if you need to edit them. If, you know, you dropped a red chem light…

40:25…another unit comes through and they say, alright, you know, we’ve checked out that building…

40:29…or we’ve checked out that door that you saw someone in, and we know…

40:33…we’re going to throw down a green chem light now.

40:35We know that everything’s okay. So they can actually come along and change that to green.

40:40And now, so everyone else knows, alright, that area is clear, or that building is clear…

40:45…whatever the event might be that you dropped the chem light for. In the Squad Leader app…

40:50…you can also submit your spot reports directly from your device just like you were able to…

40:54…in the Vehicle Commander, too. So to do that…

40:58…we’ll just go ahead and click our Menu button and we’ll select Spot Report.

41:02For the Squad Leader app, the first thing it’s going to tell you to do is…

41:05…actually select in the display where you want to drop that spot report.

41:09So let’s select something near me. And it’s going to bring up our form to fill out our spot report.

41:16So in this one, we’ve got a slightly different set of choices to select from. We’ll select the size of guys we saw.

41:22We’ll say it was just a team-sized group of guys hanging around, and we’ll say they were, you know…

41:29…moving, driving away in a truck. Once again, we just…

41:32…saw some suspicious activity, saw a group of guys with rifles moving away, and…

41:37…it’s going to ask us what the location is. In this case, we selected to do it from the map, but you also…

41:43…if you knew the MGRS coordinates, you could enter those, or if you knew, alright…

41:47… those guys are a bearing of 118 degrees and probably 300 yards away…

41:52…you can do that by using a offset from me, or as we selected, we’re going to do it from the map.

41:59It’s going to ask you what affiliation they were, what their uniform type was. So we’ll just select Irregular.

42:08And it’s going to ask you for your time of observation once again.

42:11The current time will be populated in this area if you want to leave it…

42:14…or if you click on that time, you also have the ability to change the time if, you know…

42:19…if you saw this and you didn’t get to say something about it right away…

42:22…and you come back and you saw the report an hour ago, you can click OK and send that.

42:28It’s going to ask you of any equipment they had with them, you know. Like in the other case, we’ll say they had rifles.

42:34One difference with the Squad Leader app and the Vehicle Commander app is…

42:37… we actually have the ability to attach a file. So, you know…

42:41…we’re thinking, we’re imagining guys out there with smartphones or devices that have phones on them.

42:45If you were able to snap a photo, you could go out and actually attach a file to that. Now for right now…

42:50…I’m not going to actually take a photo. We’re sitting in a conference room. But if I wanted, say…

42:55…I had a file on my camera that I wanted to attach, I can go ahead and go into my camera’s directory and just select…

43:03…a picture from somewhere in my camera. I can actually attach that. And then, once I’m done with all that…

43:12…I can use my check mark and actually submit that.

43:21And you’ll see, we’ve got a spot report that’s now been created on the map.

43:27And from this pop-up, we can also click on it. If this wasn’t the spot report I created…

43:32…if this was one that someone else created, a different spot report in my display…

43:36…I can click on that and I can get the information that was submitted with that.

43:44So…yeah? Ben, want to take over?

43:51Alright, thanks.

44:05Thank you, Derek. So we’re going to go ahead and take a look…

44:12We just looked at two examples of templates that we’re producing that are really focused applications…

44:15…along with useful information to power those applications to work together in the field.

44:19That was our dismounted and our mounted application. As I mentioned…

44:24…all these templates are going to be available through our resource center, at resources.arcgis.com.

44:28It’s also the place you can go to look at our blogs, help forum, videos, and post ideas.

44:34So if you think there’s improvements that can be made to these templates or like to see us work on some other areas...

44:39…please communicate with us through this site.

Copyright 2014 Esri
Auto Scroll (on)Enable or disable the automatic scrolling of the transcript text when the video is playing. You can save this option if you login

Comments

No comments. Be the first to write one below.

Comment on this Video