Transcript

00:01I'm celebrating my 23rd year working in, with, and around government.

00:07Hard to believe, I can tell.

00:10Twenty-two of those years were implementing GIS and IT and I've had a chance to work with a lot of the innovators...

00:20... and the pioneers in the industry, a lot of you in this room, and a lot of users.

00:25And as I look at government and I look at the things that I got a chance to look on, I got to see a lot of trends.

00:31And with these trends I got to see everything from GIS on a mini-mainframe to a UNIX box and moved on into a desktop.

00:39I got this go from begging people to use a paper copy of my map in a meeting to seeking GIS on the Internet into operations into the field.

00:51And I kind of look at the activities that we have and where we're going and I focused on operations...

00:57...how to make government itself better, how to improve it.

01:01And we have a lot of opportunities left.

01:04There's new departments, there's new technologies to latch onto, but for me a lot of individuals come up to me and say...

01:13...Chris, what's the next big thing in government? And we are at point of our lives where there's an awful lot of collision of ideas.

01:26New social ideas, new political movements, the way people want to engage with us.

01:32And we have this opportunity to change the way in which we sell to and market to government in and of itself.

01:41So I'll ask the question again...what's new for government?

01:45It's citizens...citizen engagement, citizen participation, citizen as a sensor.

01:54And this is a really easy market for you to take a look at because you represent that market.

02:00You have an opportunity to take a look at the activities and ask a question...

02:03...why don't I interact with government? What irritates me about government that I would like to change?

02:11What types of applications should there be out there? How can I make a difference?

02:16And so we're at this point where we're starting to see these applications that are being developed...

02:20... and I really don't think that we've gotten there yet.

02:24I think the future that we'll see in government interaction and citizen engagement is yet to be seen.

02:31But let me show you a couple of early signs of the way this is happening and evolving.

02:37We have the idea of citizen as a sensor.

02:41The ability to take an opinion of a person and to take that and to collect as it's happening.

02:49Not come to city hall and participate in where you think the park should be or bike route...

02:54...it's about collecting the information as a person experiences it and reports that...

02:59...and the city will be able to go back in and take that information and use it.

03:03This is the city of Reno, Nevada.

03:07It's the idea that I'm frustrated that I can't get a broadband signal, or my phone doesn't work...

03:13... and I can go to an application store, download an app that lets the government know that I can't get a broadband signal.

03:27And that signal can be collected and then pushed back to government so that they can change things.

03:311.2 million people have downloaded that application.

03:36It's the idea of volunteerism.

03:39Not go out there and send out a message saying we're going to have a beach cleanup or a graffiti cleanup...

03:45...and if you're available, please come out.

03:46It's, we are going to be doing something, if you have the skill set, the desire, and the time...

03:52...we are going to be here and we will notify you when this is happening.

03:56It's the idea of setting a cell phone on a car seat, and as you hit a bump in the road, the pothole is recorded and sent back to city hall.

04:07These are cool applications.

04:11So the true test of time for any idea or any innovation is time itself, and GIS has met that test of time.

04:23We've seen and experienced it.

04:25We've experienced it in Haiti, we've experienced it in social media applications with the earthquakes and with the oil spills.

04:33We've experienced it in the recovery.

04:36And it's really a simple premise. Show a person an issue in relationship to where they work, live, and play, and the world makes more sense.

04:49And you know what? We're at a time where we now understand that ArcGIS is the platform for Gov 2.0.

04:58It's the platform for Health 2.0, it's the platform for Planning 2.0, Public Safety 2.0, and the list goes on.

05:06So this is outside-in thinking.

05:12This is an ability for you to take what you know.

05:13I always use an analogy of the great guru in investing, Peter Lynch.

05:19He always says, if you want to know what to invest in, invest in what you know.

05:23And each and every one of you know what it would take to improve government from your perspective.

05:30It's about looking at the community.

05:34It takes a village. It takes a village, people, to change our world.

Copyright 2014 Esri
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What's Next for Gov 2.0?

Chris Thomas, Esri government industry manager, discusses applications that use citizen interaction to improve government.

  • Recorded: Mar 6th, 2011
  • Runtime: 05:41
  • Views: 10828
  • Published: Mar 29th, 2011
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